PERSONAL

SPECTACLES

Having worn glasses since the third grade, I’m familiar with the consumer process. Each school year, I would get to choose a new pair of frames. This was a process of self-reflection and reinvention—those frames would become part of my identity.

In my 20s, after the luxury of parental health insurance waned, I discovered the perfect pair of $7 frames. They were readily available on Amazon in a variety of colorways. I had a pair of lenses custom milled for those frames and taught myself basic optician adjustments.

This DIY optometry helped me think through a new process of purchasing glasses. Instead of focusing on the frames, focus on the lenses. The question I asked was, “Is it possible to rethink the at-home optometry industry by building a glasses kit, complete with interchangeable frames that fit lenses the customer already owns?” This idea mimics the efficiency of major glasses retailers and takes it a step further—putting the power of choice and identity back in the hands of the consumer. Below are concept renderings I modeled in Fusion360. 

 
Spectacles Promotional Photo, 2015; Fusion360; Rendering by Louise Larson; Pittsburgh, PA

Spectacles Promotional Photo, 2015; Fusion360; Rendering by Louise Larson; Pittsburgh, PA

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Modularity & Materials

These aviators, following in the tradition of original aviation sunglasses, are designed to have interchangeable lenses. Set screws allow for lenses to be replaced for alternate conditions or variant prescriptions.

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Sustainability

This pair of frames incorporates cork and metal. The main body, made from cork, allows for lens interchange, while the metal arms maintain rigidity and comfort. The manufacturing process is unfortunately prohibitive for high-prescription lens accuracy.